MUNICIPALITIES

Bird and mammal control

For several years now, municipalities and government agencies in Québec have been relying on us to implement wildlife management programs directed at “pest” species. These programs are adapted to meet the needs of each client after a thorough analysis of the issues they are facing as well as their specific objectives. Our experts also take care of obtaining the permits necessary to perform the wildlife management operations.

The species for which we have developed considerable expertise include the Canada goose, ring-billed gull, mallard, pigeon, European starling, snow goose, wild turkey, American beaver, white-tailed deer and coyote.

Bird control

Large populations of birds in public places can require targeted interventions in order to minimize disturbance caused by their presence. Since many bird species are protected at the federal level by the Migratory Birds Convention Act or at the provincial level by the Act respecting the conservation and development of wildlife, it is important to be well informed and leave the management of “pest” birds in the hands of professionals.

Canada goose
Canada goose
Canada goose
In the last few decades, Canada goose populations have increased in southern Québec, to the point where the species is now considered undesirable by many. Feces left on the ground by these birds create an hygiene issue and often lead to complaints by citizens. Ecologically speaking, the presence in numbers of these big, very territorial birds can lead to a biodiversity loss at a site. Their aggressive behaviour, particularly during breeding season, can sometimes constitute a danger for humans.
Ring-billed gull
Ring-billed gull
Ring-billed gull
It is estimated that more than 70 000 breeding pairs of ring-billed gulls nest in the greater Montreal area. This species is considered a highly opportunistic feeder and food waste can make up to 70% of its diet. It is therefore not uncommon to witness big gatherings of gulls in public places such as parks, beaches and plazas. Their presence can cause a significant inconvenience for the public and their feces can affect a site’s aesthetics.
Mallard
Mallard
Mallard
The mallard is a very common dabbling duck species that is often observed in natural ponds, waste-water treatment ponds and beaches in the urban environment. These habitats provide refuge from predators, especially during migrations. Birds have a high metabolic rate and they produce a large amount of droppings which can constitute a source of water contamination. Duck feces contain fecal coliforms and can contribute to the occurrence of blue-green algae in some aquatic ecosystems. Aquatic birds also play a role in the reproductive cycle of the cercaria, the larval form of a parasite that causes a rash called “swimmer’s itch”.

Our biologists and technicians can elaborate and implement a bird management program targeting problematic species at your site according to your objectives, after a thorough analysis of the issue. Population monitoring is also integrated in the program.

We offer a combination of methods that has already proven itself to several clients: awareness workshops for citizens, bird abatement (canine team, trained birds of prey, remote-controlled vehicles, pyrotechnics, lasers, etc.), egg sterilization, installation of exclusion material (nets, fences) and more.

Mammal control

Our biologists and technicians can elaborate and implement a mammal management program targeting problematic species at your site according to your objectives, after a thorough analysis of the issue. Our methods have proved effective and meet the Ministry of Forests, Wildlife and Parks’ applicable standards and recommended practices.

When managing a problem species, we use preventive and active methods according to the needs of each client. In the case of the American beaver, for example, these measures can range from simple habitat management measures to restore normal water flow, to the sterilization of adults or the capture of problem individuals in order to rapidly resolve emergencies.

American beaver
American beaver
American beaver
There is a common misconception that the American beaver is an endangered species. On the contrary, a decrease in the numbers of its predators and reduced trapping in recent year have led to healthy beaver populations that are increasing in many regions of the province. However, its presence in urban and periurban environments can cause serious cohabitation issues with humans. While building its dam to raise water levels, a beaver can quickly flood a territory and cut the trees standing along the banks.
White-tailed deer
White-tailed deer
White-tailed deer
Even though this species can be seen a positive way by many, the presence of white-tailed deer can engender serious cohabitation issues with humans. In a urban setting, populations of this mammal can increase significantly due to low predation and hunting pressure and improved food availability. The white-tailed deer adapts very easily to human infrastructures and activities, and can cause severe damage to private properties.
Coyote
Coyote
Coyote
The coyote is an opportunistic feeder that has adapted very well to habitats created by humans in agricultural and urban environments. In agricultural environments, coyotes may threaten livestock. In urban environments, it can lose its fear of humans, which can lead to attacks on pets and people, and its presence therefore represents an issue of growing concern.

Some of the methods we recommend include:

  • Awareness workshop for citizens
  • Population monitoring
  • Capture and relocation of problem individuals
  • Marking and telemetric monitoring (transmitter collars)
  • Sterilization program
  • Repellents
  • Scare tactics